Kelley Moore articulates her vision for Saskatoon

The City of Saskatoon mayoral campaign is picking up steam, and proposals for new ideas and projects are already being released by some candidates. Kelley Moore,

The City of Saskatoon mayoral campaign is picking up steam, and proposals for new ideas and projects are already being released by some candidates. Kelley Moore, mayoral candidate for the October 26 election, says that her proposals are part of her overall vision for our Saskatoon. “The changes I’m proposing focus on people, amenities and infrastructure. They address immediate concerns, but more importantly, focus on our long-term aspirations. My platform represents the necessary steps I believe Saskatoon needs to take to reach its potential.” Moore’s campaign has identified the following priorities:CuUp1K_y

  • Listening to Communities
  •  Financial Responsibility & Accountability
  •  Sustainable Planning & Infrastructure
  •  Civic Service Satisfaction
  •  Safety & Security
  • Small Business & Entrepreneurship

How do all these fit into Moore’s vision for Saskatoon? “I see a city that is full of hustle and bustle in every way. A city that is among the most livable places in the world, for families, young entrepreneurs, small and growing businesses, people with diverse backgrounds. A city that’s talked about for its energy, its positive environment, its culture, its beauty. I want a city that’s the product of the hopes and aspirations of its residents, a city that they have a hand in building. I want to see a place where people will want to live their entire lives”, says Moore. “This is the vision that guides my

How do all these fit into Moore’s vision for Saskatoon? “I see a city that is full of hustle and bustle in every way. A city that is among the most livable places in the world, for families, young entrepreneurs, small and growing businesses, people with diverse backgrounds. A city that’s talked about for its energy, its positive environment, its culture, its beauty. I want a city that’s the product of the hopes and aspirations of its residents, a city that they have a hand in building. I want to see a place where people will want to live their entire lives”, says Moore. “This is the vision that guides my priorities.” Moore says that we need to move beyond policies that have characterized the past decade in Saskatoon because our world is changing more rapidly than ever. “The old approach has been to wait until there’s a problem, and then pour concrete to try to solve it”, says Moore. “Too much traffic congestion? Build a bridge. Too much noise? Build a wall. Too much crime? Challenge the statistics. Too much racism? Deny it exists. This is not visionary, it’s reactionary. It doesn’t build a city. It builds debt and division. And it won’t move us forward.” Moore’s plan is to stop putting on band-aids, and instead, to develop policies that create the city we want. A city that builds on the energies, passions, skillsets and diversity of its people – a place that works for everyone. She is about changing the way we are doing things to be proactive. “Visions and long-term plans work, and they pay huge dividends”, says Moore. “Just look at what Moriyama’s 100-year plan did for Saskatoon. It remains the cornerstone of how we develop around our river valley. Its value to Saskatoon has been immeasurable.”

The Saskatoon that Moore envisions is:

  •  A city that actively involves its residents in its decision making, at the neighbourhood level.
  •  A city that unites nation-to-nation and celebrates diversity and inclusion for all residents.
  •  A city whose staff is proud to deliver excellent services and programs – whether it’s street sweeping and snow clearing, connecting your utilities as a newcomer; obtaining a business licence; upgrading your home; applying for a residential parking pass; booking a community facility; or finding out which bus goes where.
  • A city that values and ensures its neighbourhoods are connected, safe and accessible. We have to do more than just implement a cosmetic road surfacing program; a complaints-driven home maintenance program; and piecemeal fixing of water and sewer lines. We need deliver the quality of life that every neighbourhood deserves. High quality roads. Convenient access to transit. Facilities for children, youth and aging adults. Green spaces where we can exercise or garden.
  •  A city where all people have a place to live and the supports they need to participate.
  •  A city where people have choice for appropriate and affordable housing through all stages of life.
  •  A city with a transportation system that moves people in the way that they choose, safely – on foot, by car, by transit, cab, or by bike.
  •  A city whose neighbourhoods include a grocery store, local shops and services nearby, places to meet neighbours, to play, to work and age in place.
  •  A city where we feel safe and comfortable – where skin colour, orientation, and cultural background are not judged but expected as part of our human family, and make us a model for inclusiveness and equal opportunity. A Saskatoon that is welcoming of all newcomers, just like our own forebears were welcomed.
  • A city where entrepreneurship and small business are celebrated, supported, and catalyzed, and where industry diversifies by building a commerce based on our creativity and work ethic.
  •  A city where large businesses are welcomed and smaller businesses can grow, creating more opportunities for our citizens and connecting us to a larger world.
  •  A city whose vision is most telling in its budget, by what it prioritizes.

We become that which we fund. Moore says that under her leadership, City Council will enable its staff – the city administration – to function at its fullest capacity. “We need the best practices – proven approaches – to find their way into Saskatoon’s way of doing things”, says Moore. “It’s Council’s job to seek the best information in order to serve our residents.” Moore has specific goals. “We need a teeming civic square, a gathering place that includes a renewed and expanded main library. I favour expansion for a new core area community centre. We have to stop merely talking about putting people into our downtown, and instead make tangible progress by creating areas where people can live, work, raise a family, learn, recreate, and age in place, downtown.” “A civic arena may be part of that development, but it is likely 10 or more years away”, says Moore. “For physically active citizens, an immediate need is more neighbourhood sports facilities such as hockey rinks. As we grow, we need to move towards a system of regional facilities that don’t require a trip across town.” “Saskatoon has many exciting prospects. New neighbourhoods that, if implemented well, can be mixed use and well connected. We have a north downtown that can be built out residentially and commercially. We can have south Caswell that hosts innovative arts and cultural businesses. I support the new School of Architecture in the old John Deere.

Building and a revamped Saskatchewan Polytechnic that becomes part of a downtown plan for student housing and amenities. I also support our educational institutes including Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technologies (SIIT) and Gabriel Dumont Institute (GDI) working together to share facilities and space, creating a better platform for knowledge sharing, training and career laddering.” “We need to implement bus rapid transit with a superior transit system, one that has reliable high frequency service to move people quickly, and a good network of bus shelters and advanced scheduling information. This system will ultimately graduate to light rail transit as Saskatoon grows. We need to plan for that now. We also need to support car sharing operations in Saskatoon and encourage alternatives such as Uber – these shared economy options requires flexibility”, says Moore. “I support the Integrated Growth Plan, and more importantly, will work towards its full implementation.” “One of our tremendous assets is our City-owned utility which can become an energy leader in the new energy economy, including renewable energy systems. We have opportunities to save residents, and the utility, money and reduce the need for non-renewable energy resources.” Saskatoon can’t do it alone. “By collaborating more with other main regional institutions like the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Polytechnic and the Health Region, we can identify synergies that create new facilities, and new growth opportunities. We will become the great city we want to be”, says Moore. Ultimately, Moore sees Saskatoon as a national and international leader. “Our experience can help advance social, economic and environmental agendas elsewhere. Our educational institutes, businesses and non profit sectors already have strong international connections”, says Moore. “These can only become more important as we’re noticed for our strategic initiatives.” Kelley Moore has a vision. It is of a Saskatoon that is economically strong, innovative, beautiful, diverse, one that respects all its citizens, and one that rewards initiative. It is this vision that will guide her as mayor.

#ExpectMoore for Communities

Contact Kelley Moore here

Moore4Mayor.ca  |  @moore4mayorYXE